Frequently Asked Questions

1. What to do if a police officer stops you…

Stop your vehicle as far out of the lane of traffic as possible. Make sure you turn your flashers on, and motion to the officer that you are going to comply.

Stay in your vehicle, and turn on the interior light. Good lighting assists good communication. Relax and remain in your vehicle. If you leave the vehicle, you subject yourself and the officer to the dangers of traffic.

Keep your hands in view, preferably on the steering wheel. Wait for the officer to request your license, registration and proof of insurance.

Police officers are trained to ask for identification first and provide and explanation second. First provide the proper documentation. Then, give the officer a chance to explain the reason you were stopped. Providing your documentation will simplify and speed the process. Remember, most often the officer is in uniform with the name tag displayed. You have the advantage of knowing with whom you are dealing. Extend the courtesy by providing the requested identification without argument.

If you do not agree with the citation, or the officer’s demeanor, do not argue at the scene. All citizens have the right to question their citation before a clerk magistrate. Every police department has an internal affairs system in place to investigate citizen complaints.

2. If you want to apply for firearms…

Persons wishing to apply for a new License to Carry Firearms or Firearms Identififcation Card, or those seeking renewal for their current License to Carry or Firearms Identififcation Card should call Officer Kristen MetivierĀ at (781) 826-3231 to schedule an appointment. If they are not at the station a voice mail message should be left for them. Please include in your message your name, address, reason for the call and a number where you can be reached during day and nighttime hours. Your call will be returned as soon as possible.

3. If you need to report a crime…

For ALL EMERGENCIES, pick up the phone and dial 911.

For non-emergencies, please call the Hanover Police business line at (781) 826-2335 and a dispatcher will direct your call or dispatch a Police Officer as needed. You may also come to the Police Station to report a crime.

4. If you want to appeal a citation…

Once a speeding citation is issued by the Police, the appeal process is done through the court system. The process is outlined on the back of the citation that is issued by the Officer. The citation needs to be sent back within 20 days whether you decide to pay for the infractions that are listed or are requesting a hearing. If the citation is not received within 20 days, you will lose your right to a hearing, will have to pay substantial late charges and your license to operate or registration will be suspended until you pay in full, including all late charges and reinstatement fees.

5. What to do if somebody writes you a bad check…

The area of returned checks is most certainly one of the largest problems many businesses face today. This area of fraud is costly to consumers and proprietors alike. The Massachusetts General Laws handle the problem of ‘bad’ checks in several specific ways. There are several important pieces of information that clerks need to obtain in order for the Police Department to assist in processing of criminal actions. It is essential that date of birth, social security number, drivers license number and telephone number be obtained at the point of sale. When a check is returned to the business, an attempt to contact the maker must be made by the business. A registered letter, must be sent to the last known address of the maker. If payment is not made within 2 days of receipt of the notice, a criminal proceeding may begin. An agent for the business must appear in at the Hingham District Court between the hours of 8:30am-4:00pm and request an application for criminal complaint. It will be necessary at this time to provide the name, address, date of birth and social security number of the person that wrote the check. Notice of hearing will be sent to the address and a representative of the store will be required to attend the clerks hearing. If the result of the hearing is the issuance of a criminal complaint, the Hanover Police Prosecutor will be responsible for handling the criminal case. Special circumstances may exist depending on the amount of money they check was for, pr the status of the bank account at the time the check was written.

6. A Junior Operators License…

Any person under the age of 18 who applies for a “Junior Operator’s License” on or after November 4, 1998 (the date the law takes effect), is subject to all of the provisions of the new law. This is true whether you obtained a Learner’s Permit before or after that date. Taking the road test on or after that date means that you will be subject to:

1. The requirement that you have possessed a Learner’s Permit for a full six (6) months before you take the road test;

2. The requirement that you have a driving record free of offenses and free of surchargeable events for a six (6) consecutive month period immediately prior to the taking of the road test (for example, a motor vehicle violation conviction in the week prior to a scheduled road test would prevent you from taking the road test and a new six [6] month period would have to begin);

3. The requirement that you have successfully completed a Driver Education Program approved by the Registrar, which includes thirty (30) hours of classroom instruction, six (6) hours of in-car behind-the-wheel driving experience and six (6) hours of in-car experience observing another Permit holder’s supervised driving; and

4. The requirement that you completed twelve (12) hours of supervised driving experience in addition to the driving experience in the Driver Education Program.

B. Restrictions on the Holder of a Junior Operator’s License (JOL):

(1) JOL Obtained Prior to November 4, 1998:

If you obtained your JOL prior to November 4, 1998 and you are still under age 18, you will become subject to:

1. The unexpired portion of the six month passenger restriction. The passenger restriction becomes effective on November 4, 1998. It applies to any JOL holder under the age of 18 during the first six (6) months after obtaining the JOL, even if the JOL holder obtained the JOL prior to November 4th. As a JOL holder, you may be subject to some portion of the six (6) month period if you have not had the JOL for the full six (6) months by November 4, 1998 and you have not turned 18 years of age by that date. For example:

– a JOL holder who obtained the JOL prior to May 4, 1998 would not be subject to the passenger restriction at all, regardless of his/her age (obtained the JOL more than six [6] months prior to November 4, 1998);

– a JOL holder who obtained the JOL two (2) months before the effective date would still be subject to the passenger restriction for four (4) months after November 4, 1998 (if not yet 18);

– a JOL holder who turned age 18 prior to the effective date would not be subject to the passenger restriction; and

– a JOL holder who turned age 18 after the effective date would no longer be subject to the passenger restriction, even if the JOL holder had not completed the portion of the six (6) month restriction that applied to him or her.

General Rule: The passenger restriction that applies to you as a JOL holder under the age of 18, will be lifted once you have completed the six (6) month period (or the portion that applies to you) or upon reaching the age of 18, whichever occurs first.

2. The provision that requires additional suspension penalties for anyone under the age of 21 who commits certain motor vehicle offenses on or after November 4, 1998 when alcohol or drug use is involved, including enhanced suspension penalties if you are under 18 at the time of the offense;

3. The restriction that you may not operate a motor vehicle between the hours of 12:00 AM (midnight) and 5:00 AM (if still under age 18) unless you are accompanied by a parent or legal guardian;

4. The provision that requires additional suspension penalties for anyone who commits certain motor vehicle offenses on or after November 4, 1998 involving speeding and/or drag racing while in possession of a JOL;

5. The restriction that you may not operate a motor vehicle requiring a commercial driver’s license.

(2) JOL Obtained on or After November 4, 1998:

If you obtain your JOL on or after November 4, 1998 you will be subject to all of the provisions of the new law, including:

1. The six (6) month passenger restriction. As a JOL holder you may not operate a motor vehicle while a person under the age of 18, other than yourself or an immediate family member, is present in the vehicle unless you are accompanied by an operator, duly licensed in his state of residence, who is at least 21 years of age, who has at least one (1) year of driving experience and who is seated next to you. (Note: Black’s Law Dictionary defines “immediate family member” as the term generally referring to one’s parents, wife or husband, children, and brothers and sisters.)

General Rule: The passenger restriction that applies to you as a JOL holder under the age of 18 who obtained the JOL on or after November 4, 1998, will be lifted once you have completed the six (6) month period or upon reaching the age of 18, whichever occurs first.

2. The provision that requires additional suspension penalties for anyone under the age of 21 who commits certain motor vehicle offenses on or after November 4, 1998 when alcohol or drug use is involved, including enhanced suspension penalties if you are under age 18 at the time of the offense;

3. The restriction that you may not operate a motor vehicle between the hours of 12:00 AM (midnight) and 5:00 AM (if still under age 18) unless accompanied by a parent or legal guardian;

4. The provision that requires additional suspension penalties for anyone who commits certain motor vehicle offenses on or after November 4,1998 involving speeding and/or drag racing while in possession of a JOL;

5. The restriction that you may not operate a motor vehicle requiring a commercial driver’s license;

7. Where is the department located?…

The Hanover Police Department is located at 129 Rockland Street in Hanover, MA.

8. To get a copy of an accident report…

Accident reports are available from the Records Department at the Hanover Police Department. usually within one to three days after the accident. You can get a copy by stopping by the department. It’s a good idea to call ahead of time to verify the report is ready. Copies are $1.00.

9. If you get a phone call claiming you have won something…

The best rule of thumb is that if something sounds to good to be true, it is. And if you feel at all uneasy, there’s probably a good reason for that. You should never have to divulge personal information to receive a prize. And it’s always best to get information in writing, rather than over the telephone. If you do talk to someone on the phone, get their full name, the name of the company and the phone number. Then you can call back to verify it is a legitimate company. If they won’t give you a name and number, chances are it is not legitimate.

10. What we can do about harassing phone calls…

Before an officer can begin an investigation, you must successfully trace at least two of those calls and document the trace. Information about how to do this is printed in your telephone book or call your telephone company for help. After the traces, you must call the telephone company as well before you can report it to the police. When you do call the police department, obtain a case number that can be furnished to the telephone company.

Caller ID is not the same thing as tracing a call. If you have a caller ID box, you still must work with the telephone company to trace the call. Caller ID is not admissible in court.